Diabetes risk assessment in Latinas: Effectiveness of a brief diabetes risk questionnaire for detecting prediabetes in a community-based sample

Adam B. Scanlan, Catarina M. Maia, Alberly Perez, Carol J. Homko, Matthew J. O'Brien*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective. Numerous validated questionnaires use self-reported data to quantify individuals' risk of having diabetes or developing it in the future. Evaluations of these tools have primarily used nationally representative data, limiting their application in clinical and community settings. This analysis tested the effectiveness of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) risk questionnaire for identifying prediabetes in a community-based sample of Latinas. Methods. Data were collected using the ADA risk questionnaire and assessing A1C. Among 204 participants without diabetes, we examined the association between individual characteristics and glycemic status. We then calculated the performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value [PPV], and negative predictive value [NPV]) of the ADA risk questionnaire for detecting prediabetes, using A1C results as the gold standard to define the outcome. Results. All participants were women of self-reported Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. Their mean ADA risk score was 5.6 ± 1.6. Latinas who had prediabetes were older, with significantly higher rates of hypertension and a higher ADA risk score than those without prediabetes. At a risk score ≥5-the threshold for high risk set by the ADA-the questionnaire had the following test performance characteristics: sensitivity 77.8%, specificity 41.7%, PPV 76.2%, and NPV 43.9%. Conclusion. The ADA risk questionnaire demonstrates reasonable performance for identifying prediabetes in a community-based sample of Latinas. Our data may guide other groups' use of this tool in the same target population. Future research should examine the effectiveness of this questionnaire for recruiting diverse populations into diabetes prevention programs. In addition, unique diabetes risk assessment tools for specific target populations are needed and may outperform questionnaires developed using nationally representative data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-36
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Spectrum
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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