Dialysis Providers’ Perceptions of Barriers to Transplant for Black and Low-Income Patients: A Mixed Methods Analysis Guided by the Socio-Ecological Model for Transplant

Anna Michelle M. McSorley, John D. Peipert, Cynthia Gonzalez, Keith C. Norris, Christina J. Goalby, Leanne J. Peace, Amy D. Waterman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although mandates require all dialysis patients be informed about transplant, Black and low-income patients remain less likely to receive transplant education, and significant racial and socioeconomic disparities in access to transplant persist. This mixed methods study, utilizing surveys and focus groups, examined 48 dialysis providers’ perceptions of transplant barriers for Black and low-income patients. Focus group transcripts were coded for common themes, which were organized by level of the Socio-Ecological Model for Transplant (SEMT). On surveys, over 50 percent of providers reported having insufficient time to provide transplant education. In focus groups, providers perceived that Black and low-income patients experience greater barriers to transplant. These perceptions, as well as limited time and resources, could enable subtle biases against comprehensive transplant education for these patient groups to emerge. Raising awareness among providers about existing biases and supplementing transplant education within dialysis centers may improve the consistency of education and access to transplant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-417
Number of pages19
JournalWorld Medical and Health Policy
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Black
  • dialysis
  • disparities
  • education
  • kidney
  • low-income
  • socio-ecological model
  • transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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