Dietary intakes among South Asian adults differ by length of residence in the USA

Sameera A. Talegawkar, Namratha R Kandula, Meghana D. Gadgil, Dipika Desai, Alka M. Kanaya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To examine whether nutrient and food intakes among South Asian adult immigrants differ by length of residence in the USA. Design Cross-sectional analysis to examine differences in nutrient and food intakes by length of residence in the USA. Dietary data were collected using an interviewer-administered, culturally appropriate FFQ, while self-reported length of residence was assessed using a questionnaire and modelled as tertiles. Setting The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study. Subjects Eight hundred and seventy-four South Asians (mean age=55 (sd 9) years; 47 % women; range of length of residence in the USA=2-58 years), part of the baseline examination of the MASALA study. Results Intakes of fat, including saturated and trans fats, dietary cholesterol and n-6 fatty acids, were directly associated with length of residence, while intakes of energy, carbohydrate, glycaemic index and load, protein, dietary fibre, folate and K were inversely associated with length of residence (P trend <0·05). A longer length of residence in the USA was also associated with higher intakes of alcoholic beverages, mixed dishes including pizza and pasta, fats and oils, and lower intakes of beans and lentils, breads, grains and flour products, milk and dairy products, rice, starchy vegetables and sugar, candy and jam (P for differences across groups <0·05). Conclusions Length of residence in the USA influences diet and nutrient intakes among South Asian adult immigrants and should be considered when investigating and planning dietary interventions to mitigate chronic disease risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-355
Number of pages8
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Fats
Food
Atherosclerosis
Eating
Candy
Glycemic Index
Dietary Cholesterol
Lens Plant
Alcoholic Beverages
Dairy Products
Bread
Dietary Fiber
Flour
Energy Intake
Folic Acid
Vegetables
Oils
Milk
Chronic Disease
Fatty Acids

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Foods
  • Length of residence in USA
  • Nutrients
  • South Asians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Talegawkar, Sameera A. ; Kandula, Namratha R ; Gadgil, Meghana D. ; Desai, Dipika ; Kanaya, Alka M. / Dietary intakes among South Asian adults differ by length of residence in the USA. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2016 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 348-355.
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Dietary intakes among South Asian adults differ by length of residence in the USA. / Talegawkar, Sameera A.; Kandula, Namratha R; Gadgil, Meghana D.; Desai, Dipika; Kanaya, Alka M.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 348-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Dietary intakes among South Asian adults differ by length of residence in the USA

AU - Talegawkar, Sameera A.

AU - Kandula, Namratha R

AU - Gadgil, Meghana D.

AU - Desai, Dipika

AU - Kanaya, Alka M.

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N2 - Objective To examine whether nutrient and food intakes among South Asian adult immigrants differ by length of residence in the USA. Design Cross-sectional analysis to examine differences in nutrient and food intakes by length of residence in the USA. Dietary data were collected using an interviewer-administered, culturally appropriate FFQ, while self-reported length of residence was assessed using a questionnaire and modelled as tertiles. Setting The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study. Subjects Eight hundred and seventy-four South Asians (mean age=55 (sd 9) years; 47 % women; range of length of residence in the USA=2-58 years), part of the baseline examination of the MASALA study. Results Intakes of fat, including saturated and trans fats, dietary cholesterol and n-6 fatty acids, were directly associated with length of residence, while intakes of energy, carbohydrate, glycaemic index and load, protein, dietary fibre, folate and K were inversely associated with length of residence (P trend <0·05). A longer length of residence in the USA was also associated with higher intakes of alcoholic beverages, mixed dishes including pizza and pasta, fats and oils, and lower intakes of beans and lentils, breads, grains and flour products, milk and dairy products, rice, starchy vegetables and sugar, candy and jam (P for differences across groups <0·05). Conclusions Length of residence in the USA influences diet and nutrient intakes among South Asian adult immigrants and should be considered when investigating and planning dietary interventions to mitigate chronic disease risk.

AB - Objective To examine whether nutrient and food intakes among South Asian adult immigrants differ by length of residence in the USA. Design Cross-sectional analysis to examine differences in nutrient and food intakes by length of residence in the USA. Dietary data were collected using an interviewer-administered, culturally appropriate FFQ, while self-reported length of residence was assessed using a questionnaire and modelled as tertiles. Setting The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study. Subjects Eight hundred and seventy-four South Asians (mean age=55 (sd 9) years; 47 % women; range of length of residence in the USA=2-58 years), part of the baseline examination of the MASALA study. Results Intakes of fat, including saturated and trans fats, dietary cholesterol and n-6 fatty acids, were directly associated with length of residence, while intakes of energy, carbohydrate, glycaemic index and load, protein, dietary fibre, folate and K were inversely associated with length of residence (P trend <0·05). A longer length of residence in the USA was also associated with higher intakes of alcoholic beverages, mixed dishes including pizza and pasta, fats and oils, and lower intakes of beans and lentils, breads, grains and flour products, milk and dairy products, rice, starchy vegetables and sugar, candy and jam (P for differences across groups <0·05). Conclusions Length of residence in the USA influences diet and nutrient intakes among South Asian adult immigrants and should be considered when investigating and planning dietary interventions to mitigate chronic disease risk.

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