Dietary lipids, sugar, fiber, and mortality from coronary heart disease. Bivariate analysis of international data

K. Liu, J. Stamler, M. Trevisan, D. Moss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Univariate analyses with data for the years 1954-1969 from 20 economically advanced countries showed that a combined dietary lipid score based on per capita consumption of saturated fat, cholesterol, and polyunsaturated fat (equation of Keys, et al.) and the consumption of refined and processed sugars were both highly correlated with age-standardized coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates for the years 1969-1973 for both men and women aged 35-74 years (r values of 0.54 to 0.72). Fiber intake, estimated as the sum of calories available from vegetables, fruits, grains, and legumes, yielded as a significant inverse correlation with CHD mortality rates (r = -0.49 to -0.68). These three dietary variables are highly intercorrelated. With bivariate analyses (2 x 2 cross-classification and analysis of variance), lipid score, but neither that of sucrose of fiber, was consistently and significantly related to CDH mortality. However, with both higher and lower lipid scores, CHD mortality rates tended to be slightly (nonsignificantly) higher with higher sugar values and with lower fiber values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-227
Number of pages7
JournalArteriosclerosis
Volume2
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 1 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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