Dietary patterns are associated with disease risk among participants in the women's health initiative observational study

Linda Van Horn*, Lu Tian, Marian L. Neuhouser, Barbara V. Howard, Charles B. Eaton, Linda Snetselaar, Nirupa R. Matthan, Alice H. Lichtenstein

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in women. A nested case-control study tested whether dietary patterns predicted CHD events among 1224 participants in the Women's Health Initiative-Observational Study (WHI-OS) with centrally confirmed CHD, fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarct compared to 1224 WHI-OS controls matched for age, enrollment date, race/ethnicity, and absence of CHD at baseline or follow-up. The first six principal components explained .75% of variation in dietary intakes and K-mean analysis based on these six components produced three clusters. Diet cluster 1 was rich in carbohydrate, vegetable protein, fiber, dietary vitamin K, folate, carotenoids, a-linolenic acid [18:3(n-3)], linoleic acid [18:2(n-6)], and supplemental calcium and vitamin D. Diet cluster 2 was rich in total and animal protein, arachidonic acid [20:4(n-6)], DHA [22:6(n-3)], vitamin D, and calcium. Diet cluster 3 was rich in energy, total fat, and trans fatty acids (all P, 0.01). Conditional logistic regression analysis demonstrated diet cluster 1 was associated with lower CHD risk than diet cluster 2 (reference group) adjusted for smoking, education, and physical activity [OR = 0.79 (95% CI = 0.64, 0.99); P = 0.038]. This difference was not significant after adjustment for BMI and systolic blood pressure. Diet cluster 3 was associated with higher CHD risk than diet cluster 2 [OR = 1.28 (95% CI = 1.04, 1.57); P = 0.019], but this difference did not remain significant after adjustment for smoking, education, and physical activity. Within this WHI-OS cohort, distinct dietary patterns may be associated with subsequent CHD outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-291
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume142
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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