Differences in the time course of dopaminergic supersensitivity following chronic administration of haloperidol, molindone, or sulpiride

Elisabeth S. Prosser, Raj Pruthi, John G. Csernansky*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

The onset and persistence of changes in 3H-spiroperidol binding to dopamine (DA) D2 receptors were examined in rat mesolimbic and striatal regions following daily administration of haloperidol, molindone, or sulpiride for 3, 7, 14, or 28 days. Neuroleptic dose equivalencies were determined by inhibition of 3H-spiroperidol in vivo binding in several rat brain regions. Changes in locomotor and stereotyped responses to the specific DA D2 agonist quinpirole were examined 3 days after the last treatment dose. Haloperidol or molindone administration increased mean stereotypy scores and striatal DA D2 receptor densities throughout the 28-day treatment period. In contrast, mesolimbic DA D2 receptor densities were transiently increased and returned to control values after 28 days of haloperidol or molindone treatment. Sulpiride treatment increased mean stereotypy scores and striatal Bmax values, but had no effect on locomotion or mesolimbic dopamine receptor density. Additionally, the magnitude of change in the various measures of brain DA function varied among the three neuroleptic treatment groups. Results from this study suggest that mesolimbic and striatal brain regions differ in their response to long-term neuroleptic administration and that drug choice may influence the magnitude of neuroleptic-induced dopaminergic supersensitivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-116
Number of pages8
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume99
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1989

Keywords

  • Atypical neuroleptic
  • Dopamine receptor
  • Mesolimbic
  • Striatum
  • Supersensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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