Differential effects of haloperidol, clozapine, and fluperlapine on tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons and prolactin secretion in the rat

G. A. Gudelsky*, J. I. Koenig, Miljana Simonovic, T. Koyama, T. Ohmori, H. Y. Meltzer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two atypical neuroleptic agents, clozapine and fluperlapine, produced rapid elevations in plasma PRL concentrations that were similar in magnitude to those produced by haloperidol. However, the PRL response to clozapine or fluperlapine was of much shorter duration than that elicited by haloperidol. Clozapine, but neither fluperlapine nor haloperidol, produced a rapid increase in the activity of tuberoinfundibular dopamine (TIDA) neurons, as evidenced by an enhanced accumulation of dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) in the median eminence after the inhibition of DOPA decarboxylase. The clozapine-induced increase in DOPA accumulation was evident within 30 minutes after its administration and persisted for at least 4 hours. The clozapine-induced increase in the activity of TIDA neurons may account, in part, for the abbreviated PRL response to this neuroleptic. In addition, ability to produce a short-lived increase in PRL secretion in the rat appears to be common to the atypicl neuroleptic drugs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-240
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Neural Transmission
Volume68
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1987

Keywords

  • Neuroleptics
  • clozapine
  • dopamine
  • hypothalamus
  • prolactin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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