Differential effects of systemic versus intracranial injection of opiates on central, orofacial and lower body nociception: somatotypy in bulbar analgesia systems

Joel P Rosenfeld*, Susan Stocco

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

1 μg morphine sulfate or 30 μg [d-Ala2]-met-enkephalin microcannulated into the bulbar nuclei reticularis gigantocellularis and paragigantocellularis produced profound analgesia for orofacial thermal nociception, while having a smaller analgesic effect on tail-flick latency, and no effect on aversive stimulation thresholds in midbrain and in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (subnucleus caudalis). Systemic morphine (10 mg/kg). producing equivalently profound orofacial analgesia, profoundly affected tail-flick latency and trigeminal nuclear stimulation thresholds, while still failing to affect to affect aversive midbrain stimulation threshold.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-318
Number of pages12
JournalPain
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pharmacology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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