Differential expression of inflammatory cytokines parallels progression of central nervous system pathology in two clinically distinct models of multiple sclerosis

Wendy Smith Begolka, Carol L. Vanderlugt, Sandra M. Rahbe, Stephen D. Miller*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

176 Scopus citations

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated demyelinating disease of unknown etiology that presents with either a chronic-progressive or relapsing-remitting clinical course. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) and relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (R-EAE) in the SJL/J mouse are both relevant murine CD4+ T cell-mediated demyelinating models that recapitulate the multiple sclerosis disease phenotypes. To determine the cellular and molecular basis for these observed differences in clinical course, we quantitatively analyzed the temporal expression of pro- and antiinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression in the central nervous system (CNS) and the phenotype of the inflammatory mononuclear infiltrates. TMEV-infected SJL/J mice expressed IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-4 mRNA during the preclinical phase, and their levels continued to increase throughout the duration of the chronic-progressive disease course. These data correlated with the continued presence of both CD4+ T cells and F4/80+ macrophages within the CNS infiltrates. In contrast, SJL/J mice with PLP139-151-induced R-EAE displayed a biphasic pattern of CNS expression for the proinflammatory cytokines, IFN-γ and TNF-α, with expression peaking at the height of the acute phase and relapse(s). This pattern correlated with dynamic changes in the CD4+ T cell and F4/80+ macrophage populations during relapsing- remitting disease progression. Interestingly, IL-4 message was undetectable until disease remission(s), demonstrating its potential role in the intrinsic regulation of ongoing disease, whereas IL-10 was continuously expressed, arguing against a regulatory role in either disease. These data suggest that the kinetics of cytokine expression together with the nature of the persistent inflammatory infiltrates are major contributors to the differences in clinical course between TMEV-IDD and R-EAE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4437-4446
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume161
Issue number8
StatePublished - Oct 15 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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