Differential parenting of African American adolescents as an explanation for gender disparities in achievement

Fatima Varner*, Jelani Mandara

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Differential parenting based on gender and birth order status was examined as an explanation for the achievement differences between African American males and females. In a sample of 796 African American adolescents from the MADICS study, girls were found to have much higher GPAs and test scores compared with boys. Girls reported receiving more monitoring, communication, and rule enforcement, but less autonomy in decision making than later-born boys. Mothers also reported higher expectations for girls than boys. A significant percent of the GPA and test score gap was accounted for by the parenting differences in both married and single mother-headed households. It was concluded that reducing differential parenting could help narrow gender differences in achievement among African American adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-680
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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