Differential protein partitioning within the herpesvirus tegument and envelope underlies a complex and variable virion architecture

Kevin Patrick Bohannon, Yonggun Jun, Steven P. Gross, Gregory Allan Smith*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

The herpesvirus virion is a multilayered structure consisting of a DNA-filled capsid, tegument, and envelope. Detailed reconstructions of the capsid are possible based on its icosahedral symmetry, but the surrounding tegument and envelope layers lack regular architecture. To circumvent limitations of symmetry-based ultrastructural reconstruction methods, a fluorescence approach was developed using single-particle imaging combined with displacement measurements at nanoscale resolution. An analysis of 11 tegument and envelope proteins defined the composition and plasticity of symmetric and asymmetric elements of the virion architecture. The resulting virion protein map ascribes molecular composition to density profiles previously acquired by traditional ultrastructural methods, and provides a way forward to examine the dynamics of the virion architecture during infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E1613-E1620
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume110
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 23 2013

Keywords

  • Asymmetry
  • Heterogeneity
  • Point-spread function
  • Pseudorabies
  • Virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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