Dimensions of Sexual Orientation and Rates of Intimate Partner Violence Among Young Sexual Minority Individuals Assigned Female at Birth: The Role of Perceived Partner Jealousy

Christina Dyar*, Brian A. Feinstein, Arielle R. Zimmerman, Michael E. Newcomb, Brian Mustanski, Sarah W. Whitton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Sexual minorities assigned female at birth are at increased risk for experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) compared with heterosexual individuals, and bisexual individuals assigned female at birth appear to be at greatest risk. However, few studies have examined potential explanatory factors. Partner jealousy may contribute to bisexual individuals' increased risk for experiencing IPV, given stereotypes that they are promiscuous and evidence that people anticipate being jealous of a bisexual partner. Method: This study examined the role of perceived partner jealousy in cross-sectional associations between self-reported dimensions of sexual orientation (identity, attractions, and behavior) and IPV victimization among 368 young sexual minorities assigned female at birth (77.4% cisgender women). Results: Sexual behavior was associated with IPV, but sexual identity and attractions were not. Those with both male and female sexual partners in their lifetime were at increased risk for many forms of IPV compared with those with only male partners and those who never had sex, and these associations were partially explained by their higher perceived partner jealousy. Those with male and female partners were only at increased risk for two types of IPV compared with those with only female partners, and these differences were not explained by perceived partner jealousy. Conclusions: Jealousy may contribute to behaviorally bisexual individuals' increased risk for many forms of IPV compared with those with only male partners or those who never had sex. This highlights the importance of considering multiple dimensions of sexual orientation and has implications for the development of interventions to reduce IPV in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychology of Violence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Bisexuality
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Jealousy
  • Sexual minority

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology

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