Dinitrochlorobenzene: Inflammatory Response and Delayed Cutaneous Hypersensitivity

Michael W. Johnson, Howard I. Maibach, Sydney E. Salmon, William J. Catalona, Peyton T. Taylor, Paul B. Chretien

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To the Editor: The authors of the recent article on contact sensitization1 failed to appreciate the importance of graded assessment of the inflammatory response in subjects studied for delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity (DCH) to dinitro-chlorobenzene (DNCB), perhaps owing to misinterpretation of our findings.2 In the study by Catalona et al.1 12 patients with cancer did not have DCH to DNCB, but nine of these patients had “irritative reactions” to the sensitizing dose of DNCB. Catalona said that this was inconsistent with our study, which showed an impaired inflammatory response to 10 per cent croton oil in patients with cancer who had.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume286
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - May 25 1972

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Dinitrochlorobenzene
Delayed Hypersensitivity
Skin
Croton Oil
Neoplasms
chlorobenzene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Johnson, Michael W. ; Maibach, Howard I. ; Salmon, Sydney E. ; Catalona, William J. ; Taylor, Peyton T. ; Chretien, Paul B. / Dinitrochlorobenzene : Inflammatory Response and Delayed Cutaneous Hypersensitivity. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1972 ; Vol. 286, No. 21.
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abstract = "To the Editor: The authors of the recent article on contact sensitization1 failed to appreciate the importance of graded assessment of the inflammatory response in subjects studied for delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity (DCH) to dinitro-chlorobenzene (DNCB), perhaps owing to misinterpretation of our findings.2 In the study by Catalona et al.1 12 patients with cancer did not have DCH to DNCB, but nine of these patients had “irritative reactions” to the sensitizing dose of DNCB. Catalona said that this was inconsistent with our study, which showed an impaired inflammatory response to 10 per cent croton oil in patients with cancer who had.",
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Dinitrochlorobenzene : Inflammatory Response and Delayed Cutaneous Hypersensitivity. / Johnson, Michael W.; Maibach, Howard I.; Salmon, Sydney E.; Catalona, William J.; Taylor, Peyton T.; Chretien, Paul B.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 286, No. 21, 25.05.1972.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dinitrochlorobenzene

T2 - Inflammatory Response and Delayed Cutaneous Hypersensitivity

AU - Johnson, Michael W.

AU - Maibach, Howard I.

AU - Salmon, Sydney E.

AU - Catalona, William J.

AU - Taylor, Peyton T.

AU - Chretien, Paul B.

PY - 1972/5/25

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AB - To the Editor: The authors of the recent article on contact sensitization1 failed to appreciate the importance of graded assessment of the inflammatory response in subjects studied for delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity (DCH) to dinitro-chlorobenzene (DNCB), perhaps owing to misinterpretation of our findings.2 In the study by Catalona et al.1 12 patients with cancer did not have DCH to DNCB, but nine of these patients had “irritative reactions” to the sensitizing dose of DNCB. Catalona said that this was inconsistent with our study, which showed an impaired inflammatory response to 10 per cent croton oil in patients with cancer who had.

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