Direct relation of long-term synaptic potentiation to phosphorylation of membrane protein F1, a substrate for membrane protein kinase C

David M. Lovinger, Patricia A. Colley, Raymond F. Akers, Robert B. Nelson, Aryeh Routtenberg*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

148 Scopus citations

Abstract

One hour after long-term potentiation (LTP) in the intact hippocampus, a selective increase in protein F1 in vitro phosphorylation was observed in homogenate prepared from dorsal hippocampus. Protein F1 phosphorylation was directly related to the magnitude and persistence of potentiation. No other phosphoprotein studied exhibited a relationship with synaptic enhancement. Low-frequency, non-potentiating stimulation did not increase protein F1 phosphorylation, and phosphorylation of F1 was not elevated when high-frequency stimulation did not produce potentiation. We also confirmed our earlier demonstration of a similar pattern of results 5 min after LTP. In related work we have previously observed: (1) that protein F1 is a substrate for protein kinase C (PKC); (2) that membrane PKC activity was increased by translocation from the cytosol following LTP; and (3) that membrane PKC activity was directly related to the persistence of enhancement. We therefore predicted in the present study that protein F1 phosphorylation in a dorsal hippocampal membrane fraction would be related to LTP. Hippocampal membrane protein F1 was found to be directly related to both the magnitude and persistence of response enhancement. Thus the molecular events leading to prolonged potentiation may involve increased PKC/protein F1 association. Persistence of potentiation may be related to synaptic growth processes involving the growth-associated function of protein F1.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-211
Number of pages7
JournalBrain research
Volume399
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 10 1986

Keywords

  • Dentate gyrus
  • Intact hippocampus
  • Long-term potentiation
  • Perforant path
  • Protein F
  • Protein kinase C
  • Protein phosphorylation
  • Synaptic plasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

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