Discovery of collocation patterns: From visual words to visual phrases

Yuan Junsong*, Wu Ying, Yang Ming

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

194 Scopus citations

Abstract

A visual word lexicon can be constructed by clustering primitive visual features, and a visual object can be described by a set of visual words. Such a "bag-of-words" representation has led to many significant results in various vision tasks including object recognition and categorization. However, in practice, the clustering of primitive visual features tends to result in synonymous visual words that over-represent visual patterns, as well as polysemous visual words that bring large uncertainties and ambiguities in the representation. This paper aims at generating a higher-level lexicon, i.e. visual phrase lexicon, where a visual phrase is a meaningful spatially co-occurrent pattern of visual words. This higher-level lexicon is much less ambiguous than the lower-level one. The contributions of this paper include: (1) a fast and principled solution to the discovery of significant spatial co-occurrent patterns using frequent itemset mining; (2) a pattern summarization method that deals with the compositional uncertainties in visual phrases; and (3) a top-down refinement scheme of the visual word lexicon by feeding back discovered phrases to tune the similarity measure through metric learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2007 IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR'07
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 11 2007
Event2007 IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR'07 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Jun 17 2007Jun 22 2007

Publication series

NameProceedings of the IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
ISSN (Print)1063-6919

Other

Other2007 IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR'07
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period6/17/076/22/07

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

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