Discovery of the clock mutant and the first mammalian clock gene and the links to obesity: Starting with animal #25

Fred W. Turek*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The discovery of the Clock mutant mouse in 1994 and the identification and cloning of the gene underlying the mutation, named Clock, was a landmark finding in the history of the field of mammalian circadian rhythms. Unexpected at the time, the discovery of the Clock mutant animal would eventually lead to an entire new approach to the study and treatment of obesity. The report in 2005 that the Clock mutant animal is obese and shows signs of the metabolic syndrome opened up an entire new field of obesity research. Although still in the early stages of discovery, linking circadian clock genes to energy regulation has clear implications for future studies on body weight regulation at the mechanistic level, as well as for the development of new therapeutic approaches for combatting the epidemic of obesity, as well as metabolic disorders, including diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationChronobiology and Obesity
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages1-9
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9781461450825
ISBN (Print)1461450810, 9781461450818
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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