Discriminating between generalized anxiety disorder and anxiety disorder not otherwise specified in a Hispanic population: Is it only a matter of worry?

Linda L. Street*, Ester Salman, Robin Garfinkle, Joao Silvestri, Jose Carrasco, Dora Cardenas, Richard Zinbarg, David H. Barlow, Michael R. Liebowitz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

One hundred and two Hispanic persons who presented for treatment at a specialized anxiety disorders clinic were evaluated at intake using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule-Revised (ADIS-R; DiNardo and Barlow [1988] Albany: Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, State University of New York at Albany). Results indicated that 14% of these patients suffered from anxiety and/or affective disorders that were not adequately captured by our current diagnostic system. Given that the majority of these cases were characterized by predominantly anxious features, further investigation was undertaken to determine the degree of overlap between these patients (anxiety disorder, not otherwise specified; NOS) and those with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The two groups differed only with regard to the number of excessive worries they reported and not in terms of somatic symptomatology, psychosocial stressors, or demographic variables. These data suggest that excessive worry may be a discriminating factor between the GAD and NOS groups, providing support for the notion of GAD as a disorder of chromic worry. Future research is needed to tease apart the relative influences of culture and socioeconomic status on our findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalDepression and anxiety
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Diagnosis
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Somatic
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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