Disease and treatment factors associated with lower quality of life scores in adults with multiple endocrine neoplasia type I

Sneha Goswami, Benjamin J. Peipert, Irene Helenowski, Susan E. Yount, Cord Sturgeon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Physical and psychosocial morbidity of multiple endocrine neoplasia type-1 is ill-defined. How disease and treatment-related factors relate to patient-reported outcomes including health-related quality of life is unknown. We hypothesized that disease and treatment burden negatively impacts health-related quality of life in adults with multiple endocrine neoplasia type-1. Methods Adults (≥18 years) with multiple endocrine neoplasia type-1 completed an online survey of demographics, disease features, treatments, and Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 29-item profile measure, and scores were compared with normative US data. Multivariable modeling was performed to evaluate factors associated with decreased health-related quality of life. Results Multiple endocrine neoplasia type-1 patients (n = 207) reported worse health-related quality of life compared with US normative data in all health-related quality of life domains (P <.001). Persistent hypercalcemia after parathyroid surgery was associated with higher levels of anxiety, depression, fatigue, and decreased social functioning (P <.05). Patients <45 years of age at diagnosis reported worse physical and social functioning (P <.01). Traveling >50 miles for doctor appointments and ≥20 doctor appointments/year (P <.05) were associated with worse health-related quality of life. History of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors was not associated with worse health-related quality of life. Conclusion This is the largest study to assess clinical and treatment factors associated with health-related quality of life in multiple endocrine neoplasia type-1. Persistent hyperparathyroidism, increased travel distance and frequency of doctor appointments were all associated with worse health-related quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1270-1277
Number of pages8
JournalSurgery (United States)
Volume162
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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