Disorders of phosphate homeostasis in children, part 2: hypophosphatemic and hyperphosphatemic disorders

Richard M. Shore*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Phosphorus, predominantly in the form of inorganic phosphate PO4−3, has many essential physiological functions. In the skeleton, phosphate and calcium form the mineral component and phosphate is also essential in regulating function of skeletal cells. Considerable advances have been made in our understanding of phosphate homeostasis since the recognition of fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) as a bone-derived phosphaturic hormone. This second part of a two-part review of disorders of phosphate homeostasis in children covers hypophosphatemic and hyperphosphatemic disorders that are of interest to the pediatric radiologist, emphasizing, but not limited to, those related to abnormalities of FGF23 signaling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric radiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Bone
  • Children
  • Fibroblast growth factor-23
  • Hypophosphatemic rickets
  • Mineralization
  • Phosphate
  • Radiography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Disorders of phosphate homeostasis in children, part 2: hypophosphatemic and hyperphosphatemic disorders'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this