Disparities in care of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult patients with solid tumors: A systematic review

the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Surgery Delivery of Surgical Care Committee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Numerous studies have demonstrated a variety of social inequalities within pediatric and young adult patients with solid tumors. This systematic review examines and consolidates the existing literature regarding disparities in pediatric and young adult solid tumor oncology. Procedure: A MeSH search was performed on the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, OvidSP Cochrane, Central, Embase, Cinhal, and Scopus. The systematic review was performed using Rayyan QCRI. Results: Total 387 articles were found on the initial search, and 34 articles were included in final review. Twenty-seven studies addressed racial and ethnic disparities; 23 addressed socioeconomic disparities. Patients with Hispanic ethnicity, Black race, and lower socioeconomic status were more likely to present at later stages, have differences in treatments and higher mortality rates. Conclusion: This qualitative systematic review identified both racial and socioeconomic disparities in pediatric cancer patients across a variety of solid tumor types. Patients with Hispanic ethnicity, Black race, and lower socioeconomic status are associated with disparities in stage at presentation, treatment, and outcome. Characterization of existing disparities provides the evidence necessary to support changes at a systemic level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere30355
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume70
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2023

Keywords

  • disparities
  • ethnicity
  • pediatric
  • race
  • socioeconomic factors
  • surgical oncology
  • systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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