Disparities in patients presenting to the emergency department with potential acute coronary syndrome: It matters if you are Black or White

Holli A. DeVon*, Larisa A. Burke, Heather Nelson, Julie J. Zerwic, Barth Riley

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To explore disparities between non-Hispanic Blacks and non-Hispanic Whites presenting to the emergency department (ED) with potential acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Background: Individuals with fewer resources have worse health outcomes and these individuals are disproportionately those of color. Methods: This prospective study enrolled 663 patients in four EDs. Clinical presentation, treatment, and patient-reported outcome variables were measured at baseline, 1, and 6 months. Results: Blacks with confirmed ACS were younger; had lower income; less education; more risk factors; more symptoms, and longer prehospital delay at presentation compared to Whites. Blacks experiencing palpitations, unusual fatigue, and chest pain were more than 3 times as likely as Whites to have ACS confirmed. Blacks with ACS had more clinic visits and more symptoms 1 month following discharge. Conclusions: Significant racial disparities remain in clinical presentation and outcomes for Blacks compared to Whites presenting to the ED with symptoms suggestive of ACS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)270-277
Number of pages8
JournalHeart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ACS
  • Acute coronary syndrome
  • African American
  • CHD
  • ED
  • Health disparities
  • OR
  • PCI
  • Race
  • SACSI
  • SES
  • Symptoms
  • WISE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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