Dissent: Ethics and epistemology

Sanford C. Goldberg*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Goldberg explores the pressure that social regularities can generate for members of certain communities. In particular, he argues that when communities have signaling practices, these practices give community members some practice-specific reasons. These include reasons for a member to indicate publically when she is opting out of the practice. An agent ought not, given the right background practice, just to quietly opt out of signaling. She ought to make her defection explicit-it ought to be voiced. This pressure is generated by fairly weak and plausible epistemic and ethical principles and bears directly on the ethics and epistemology of dissent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationVoicing Dissent
Subtitle of host publicationThe Ethics and Epistemology of Making Disagreement Public
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages40-60
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9781351721578
ISBN (Print)9781138744288
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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    Goldberg, S. C. (2018). Dissent: Ethics and epistemology. In Voicing Dissent: The Ethics and Epistemology of Making Disagreement Public (pp. 40-60). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315181189