Dissociating the role of the medial and lateral anterior prefrontal cortex in human planning

Etienne Koechlin, Gregory Corrado, Pietro Pietrini, Jordan Grafman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

241 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The anterior prefrontal cortex is known to subserve higher cognitive functions such as task management and planning. Less is known, however, about the functional specialization of this cortical region in humans. Using functional MRI, we report a double dissociation: the medial anterior prefrontal cortex, in association with the ventral striatum, was engaged preferentially when subjects executed tasks in sequences that were expected, whereas the polar prefrontal cortex, in association with the dorsolateral striatum, was involved preferentially when subjects performed tasks in sequences that were contingent on unpredictable events. These results parallel the functional segregation previously described between the medial and lateral premotor cortex underlying planned and contingent motor control and extend this division to the anterior prefrontal cortex, when task management and planning are required. Thus, our findings support the assumption that common frontal organizational principles underlie motor and higher executive functions in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7651-7656
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume97
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 20 2000

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Prefrontal Cortex
Executive Function
Motor Cortex
Cognition
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Anticipation
  • Striatum
  • Task switching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

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abstract = "The anterior prefrontal cortex is known to subserve higher cognitive functions such as task management and planning. Less is known, however, about the functional specialization of this cortical region in humans. Using functional MRI, we report a double dissociation: the medial anterior prefrontal cortex, in association with the ventral striatum, was engaged preferentially when subjects executed tasks in sequences that were expected, whereas the polar prefrontal cortex, in association with the dorsolateral striatum, was involved preferentially when subjects performed tasks in sequences that were contingent on unpredictable events. These results parallel the functional segregation previously described between the medial and lateral premotor cortex underlying planned and contingent motor control and extend this division to the anterior prefrontal cortex, when task management and planning are required. Thus, our findings support the assumption that common frontal organizational principles underlie motor and higher executive functions in humans.",
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Dissociating the role of the medial and lateral anterior prefrontal cortex in human planning. / Koechlin, Etienne; Corrado, Gregory; Pietrini, Pietro; Grafman, Jordan.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 97, No. 13, 20.06.2000, p. 7651-7656.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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