Distinct sub-second dopamine signaling in dorsolateral striatum measured by a genetically-encoded fluorescent sensor

Armando G. Salinas*, Jeong Oen Lee, Shana M. Augustin, Shiliang Zhang, Tommaso Patriarchi, Lin Tian, Marisela Morales, Yolanda Mateo, David M. Lovinger*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The development of genetically encoded dopamine sensors such as dLight has provided a new approach to measuring slow and fast dopamine dynamics both in brain slices and in vivo, possibly enabling dopamine measurements in areas like the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) where previously such recordings with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) were difficult. To test this, we first evaluated dLight photometry in mouse brain slices with simultaneous FSCV and found that both techniques yielded comparable results, but notable differences in responses to dopamine transporter inhibitors, including cocaine. We then used in vivo fiber photometry with dLight in mice to examine responses to cocaine in DLS. We also compared dopamine responses during Pavlovian conditioning across the striatum. We show that dopamine increases were readily detectable in DLS and describe transient dopamine kinetics, as well as slowly developing signals during conditioning. Overall, our findings indicate that dLight photometry is well suited to measuring dopamine dynamics in DLS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5915
JournalNature communications
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Physics and Astronomy
  • General Chemistry
  • General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology

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