Distributional effects of the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts: How do financing and behavioral responses matter?

Douglas W. Elmendorf*, Jason Furman, William G. Gale, Benjamin H. Harris

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

We reexamine the distributional effects of the 2001 and 2003 tax changes, incorporating two factors omitted in standard distributional estimates: the financing of the tax changes, and the implications of behavioral responses for both after-tax income and other aspects of well-being. Using the standard methodology, most people are made better off by the tax cuts, with the biggest percentage and absolute gains in after-tax income received by high-income households. Using our novel methodology for "dynamic distributional analysis," a large majority of households are made worse off by the tax cuts, especially in the lower three income quintiles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-380
Number of pages16
JournalNational Tax Journal
Volume61
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Economics and Econometrics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Distributional effects of the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts: How do financing and behavioral responses matter?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this