Do changes in cognitive factors influence outcome following multidisciplinary treatment for chronic pain? A cross-lagged panel analysis

John W. Burns*, Amanda Kubilus, Stephen Bruehl, R. Norman Harden, Kenneth Lofland

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

180 Scopus citations

Abstract

Changes in maladaptive cognitions may constitute therapeutic processes of multidisciplinary pain programs. A cross-lagged panel design was used to determine whether (a) early-treatment cognitive change predicted late-treatment outcome index change, but not vice versa; and (b) these effects remained significant with depression change controlled. Ninety chronic pain patients, in a 4-week multidisciplinary program, completed measures of catastrophizing, pain helplessness, depression, pain, interference, and activity level at pre-, mid-, and posttreatment. With depression changes controlled, early-treatment catastrophizing and pain helplessness changes predicted late-treatment outcome index changes, but not vice versa; early-treatment depression changes predicted late-treatment activity changes, but not vice versa. Findings advance understanding of pain treatment process and suggest that negative cognition changes may indeed affect improvements in treatment outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-91
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume71
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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