Do clinicians screen medicaid patients for syphilis or HIV when they diagnose other sexually transmitted diseases?

George Rust*, Patrick Minor, Neil Jordan, Robert Mayberry, David Satcher

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Patients diagnosed with gonorrhea or chlamydia are at high risk for HIV and syphilis, and should be offered screening for both. Goal: This study measures HIV and syphilis screening rates among Medicaid patients diagnosed with another sexually transmitted disease (STD). Study Design: Using 1998 Medicaid claims data from 4 states, we identified individuals diagnosed with gonorrhea, urogenital chlamydia, or pelvic inflammatory disease, and then measured the proportion receiving screening tests for HIV and syphilis. Results: Only 25% of STD-diagnosed Medicaid patients received screening tests for syphilis and only 15% for HIV. We found significant state-to-state variability in screening rates. Conclusion: Medicaid patients diagnosed with a nonbloodborne STD represent a high-risk group that is not adequately screened for syphilis and HIV despite repeated contact with medical professionals. Interventions should focus on eliminating missed opportunities for screening these high-risk individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)723-727
Number of pages5
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume30
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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