Do Information Technologies Improve Teenagers' Sexual Education? Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Colombia

Alberto Chong*, Marco Gonzalez-Navarro, Dean Karlan, Martín Valdivia

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study reports results from a randomized evaluation of a mandatory six-month Internet-based sexual education course implemented across public junior high schools in 21 Colombian cities. Six months after finishing the course, the study finds a 0.4 standard deviation improvement in knowledge, a 0.2 standard deviation improvement in attitudes, and a 55 percent increase in the likelihood of redeeming vouchers for condoms as a result of taking the course. The data provide no evidence of spillovers to control classrooms within treatment schools. However, the analysis provides compelling evidence that treatment effects are enhanced when a larger share of a student's friends also takes the course. The low cost of the online course along with the effectiveness the study documents suggests this technology is a viable alternative for improving sexual education in middle-income countries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-392
Number of pages22
JournalWorld Bank Economic Review
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2020

Keywords

  • Colombia
  • Internet
  • field experiment
  • information technologies
  • sex education
  • teenagers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Accounting
  • Development
  • Finance
  • Economics and Econometrics

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