Do some countries discriminate more than others? Evidence from 97 field experiments of racial discrimination in hiring

Lincoln G Quillian, Anthony Heath, Devah Pager, Arnfinn H. Midtbøen, Fenella Fleischmann, Ole Hexela

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Comparing levels of discrimination across countries can provide a window into large-scale social and political factors often described as the root of discrimination. Because of difficulties in measurement, however, little is established about variation in hiring discrimination across countries. We address this gap through a formal meta-analysis of 97 field experiments of discrimination incorporating more than 200,000 job applications in nine countries in Europe and North America. We find significant discrimination against nonwhite natives in all countries in our analysis; discrimination against white immigrants is present but low. However, discrimination rates vary strongly by country: In high-discrimination countries, white natives receive nearly twice the callbacks of nonwhites; in low-discrimination countries, white natives receive about 25 percent more. France has the highest discrimination rates, followed by Sweden. We find smaller differences among Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway, the United States, and Germany. These findings challenge several conventional macro-level theories of discrimination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)467-496
Number of pages30
JournalSociological Science
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

hiring
racism
discrimination
experiment
evidence
political factors
macro level
Belgium
Norway
social factors
Sweden
Netherlands
immigrant
France
Canada

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • Ethnicity
  • Field experiments
  • Hiring
  • Race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Quillian, Lincoln G ; Heath, Anthony ; Pager, Devah ; Midtbøen, Arnfinn H. ; Fleischmann, Fenella ; Hexela, Ole. / Do some countries discriminate more than others? Evidence from 97 field experiments of racial discrimination in hiring. In: Sociological Science. 2019 ; Vol. 6. pp. 467-496.
@article{ac9933361c8a4d3ba1f56658da9ad1ab,
title = "Do some countries discriminate more than others? Evidence from 97 field experiments of racial discrimination in hiring",
abstract = "Comparing levels of discrimination across countries can provide a window into large-scale social and political factors often described as the root of discrimination. Because of difficulties in measurement, however, little is established about variation in hiring discrimination across countries. We address this gap through a formal meta-analysis of 97 field experiments of discrimination incorporating more than 200,000 job applications in nine countries in Europe and North America. We find significant discrimination against nonwhite natives in all countries in our analysis; discrimination against white immigrants is present but low. However, discrimination rates vary strongly by country: In high-discrimination countries, white natives receive nearly twice the callbacks of nonwhites; in low-discrimination countries, white natives receive about 25 percent more. France has the highest discrimination rates, followed by Sweden. We find smaller differences among Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway, the United States, and Germany. These findings challenge several conventional macro-level theories of discrimination.",
keywords = "Discrimination, Ethnicity, Field experiments, Hiring, Race",
author = "Quillian, {Lincoln G} and Anthony Heath and Devah Pager and Midtb{\o}en, {Arnfinn H.} and Fenella Fleischmann and Ole Hexela",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.15195/V6.A18",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "467--496",
journal = "Sociological Science",
issn = "2330-6696",
publisher = "Society for Sociological Science",

}

Do some countries discriminate more than others? Evidence from 97 field experiments of racial discrimination in hiring. / Quillian, Lincoln G; Heath, Anthony; Pager, Devah; Midtbøen, Arnfinn H.; Fleischmann, Fenella; Hexela, Ole.

In: Sociological Science, Vol. 6, 01.01.2019, p. 467-496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do some countries discriminate more than others? Evidence from 97 field experiments of racial discrimination in hiring

AU - Quillian, Lincoln G

AU - Heath, Anthony

AU - Pager, Devah

AU - Midtbøen, Arnfinn H.

AU - Fleischmann, Fenella

AU - Hexela, Ole

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Comparing levels of discrimination across countries can provide a window into large-scale social and political factors often described as the root of discrimination. Because of difficulties in measurement, however, little is established about variation in hiring discrimination across countries. We address this gap through a formal meta-analysis of 97 field experiments of discrimination incorporating more than 200,000 job applications in nine countries in Europe and North America. We find significant discrimination against nonwhite natives in all countries in our analysis; discrimination against white immigrants is present but low. However, discrimination rates vary strongly by country: In high-discrimination countries, white natives receive nearly twice the callbacks of nonwhites; in low-discrimination countries, white natives receive about 25 percent more. France has the highest discrimination rates, followed by Sweden. We find smaller differences among Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway, the United States, and Germany. These findings challenge several conventional macro-level theories of discrimination.

AB - Comparing levels of discrimination across countries can provide a window into large-scale social and political factors often described as the root of discrimination. Because of difficulties in measurement, however, little is established about variation in hiring discrimination across countries. We address this gap through a formal meta-analysis of 97 field experiments of discrimination incorporating more than 200,000 job applications in nine countries in Europe and North America. We find significant discrimination against nonwhite natives in all countries in our analysis; discrimination against white immigrants is present but low. However, discrimination rates vary strongly by country: In high-discrimination countries, white natives receive nearly twice the callbacks of nonwhites; in low-discrimination countries, white natives receive about 25 percent more. France has the highest discrimination rates, followed by Sweden. We find smaller differences among Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway, the United States, and Germany. These findings challenge several conventional macro-level theories of discrimination.

KW - Discrimination

KW - Ethnicity

KW - Field experiments

KW - Hiring

KW - Race

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071378972&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85071378972&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.15195/V6.A18

DO - 10.15195/V6.A18

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 467

EP - 496

JO - Sociological Science

JF - Sociological Science

SN - 2330-6696

ER -