Do Students Benefit from Attending Better Schools? Evidence from Rule-based Student Assignments in Trinidad and Tobago

C. Kirabo Jackson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Trinidad and Tobago students are assigned to secondary schools after the fifth grade, based on achievement tests, leading to large differences in the school environments to which students of differing initial levels of achievement are exposed. I use instrumental variables based on the discontinuities created by the assignment mechanism and exploit rich data which include students' test scores at entry and secondary school preferences to address self-selection bias. I find that attending a better school has large positive effects on examination performance at the end of secondary school. The effects are about twice as large for girls than for boys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1399-1429
Number of pages31
JournalEconomic Journal
Volume120
Issue number549
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Fingerprint

Assignment
Trinidad and Tobago
Secondary school
Rule-based
Discontinuity
Test scores
Self-selection bias
Instrumental variables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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Do Students Benefit from Attending Better Schools? Evidence from Rule-based Student Assignments in Trinidad and Tobago. / Kirabo Jackson, C.

In: Economic Journal, Vol. 120, No. 549, 01.12.2010, p. 1399-1429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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