Do you see that i see? Effects of perceived visibility on awareness checking behavior

Jeremy Birnholtz*, Nanyi Bi, Susan Fussell

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Informal interactions are a key element of group work, and many theoretical frameworks and systems have been developed to understand and support these conversations in distributed workgroups. In particular, systems used in several recent experiments provided information about others' current activities so that their availability for conversation could be assessed, and interruptions could be timed strategically. One issue with these experimental systems, though, is that many do not notify the observed party that these observations are taking place. There is reason to believe that such notification could be valuable to users, and that it could alter observers' behavior. Moreover, factors such as the perceived urgency of the interruption could affect willingness to violate social norms in gathering information. We report on an experiment assessing the impact of perceived visibility and task urgency on awareness checking behavior. Results suggest that people check more often when they believe their partners do not know they are checking, and more often when the task is time-constrained than when it is not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConference Proceedings - The 30th ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2012
Pages1765-1774
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Event30th ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2012 - Austin, TX, United States
Duration: May 5 2012May 10 2012

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Other

Other30th ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2012
CountryUnited States
CityAustin, TX
Period5/5/125/10/12

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Awareness
  • CMC
  • CSCW
  • Interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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  • Cite this

    Birnholtz, J., Bi, N., & Fussell, S. (2012). Do you see that i see? Effects of perceived visibility on awareness checking behavior. In Conference Proceedings - The 30th ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2012 (pp. 1765-1774). (Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1145/2207676.2208308