Does a Preemptive Block of the Great Auricular Nerve Improve Postoperative Analgesia in Children Undergoing Tympanomastoid Surgery?

Santhanam Suresh*, Sandra L. Barcelona, Nancy M. Young, Corri L. Heffner, Charles J. Coté

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

We performed a double-blinded randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of preemptive analgesia in children undergoing tympanomastoid surgery, Children were divided into two groups: group block-block (BB) received a preemptive great auricular nerve block (GAN-block) with 0.25% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine before incision followed by a second GAN-block with 0.25% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine 1 h before the end of the procedure. Group sham block-block (SB-B) received a preemptive GAN-block with normal saline before surgical incision followed by a GAN-block with 0.25% bupivacaine with 1:200000 epinephrine 1 h before the completion of the procedure. All patients were evaluated for pain with the objective pain score (OPS) by a blinded observer. There was no difference in pain rescue requirements in the postanesthesia care unit (BB versus SB-B, 1 of 20 versus 3 of 20, P = 0.60) or in the short-stay unit (BB versus SB-B, 5 of 20 versus 11 of 20, P = 0.107) or for the entire hospital stay (P = 0.20). There was no significant difference between groups in the time to first rescue pain medication (BB versus SB-B, 226 ± 71 min versus 201 ± 94 min). There was no significant difference between groups regarding vomiting in the postoperative period (P = 0.52). We conclude that a preoperative GAN-block does not offer significant advantages for postoperative pain relief in children undergoing tympanomastoid surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)330-333
Number of pages4
JournalAnesthesia and analgesia
Volume98
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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