Does body fatness modify the association between dietary cholesterol and risk of coronary death? Results from the Chicago Western Electric Study

David C. Goff, Richard B. Shekelle, Martijn B. Katan, Antonio M. Gotto, Jeremiah Stamler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The hypothesis that body fatness modifies the relation between dietary cholesterol and 25-year coronary mortality was examined in a cohort of 1,792 middle-aged men employed by the Western Electric Company in Chicago. Relative risks of coronary death (and 95% confidence intervals) associated with a 225 mg/day greater intake of dietary cholesterol for men with a subscapular skinfold thickness ≤14, 15-20, and ≥21 mm were 1.44 (1.10-1.90), 1.07 (0.84-1.36), and 0.95 (0.76-1.20), respectively, after adjustment for age; serum total cholesterol level; systolic blood pressure; cigarette smoking; family history of cardiovascular disease; evidence of major organ system disease at baseline; and intake of saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, energy, and ethanol. Adjusted relative risks associated with a 15-mm greater subscapular skinfold thickness for men with a dietary cholesterol intake ≤649, 650-799, and ≥800 mg/day were 1.76 (1.04-2.98), 1.64 (1.04-2.57), and 1.00 (0.69-1.55), respectively. Fatter men apparently did not benefit from a diet lower in cholesterol, while men who ate a diet high in cholesterol apparently did not benefit from leanness. These results support the hypothesis that body fatness modifies the relation between dietary cholesterol and coronary mortality, perhaps because leaner men are more responsive than fatter men to the effects of dietary cholesterol on the concentration of low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)755-761
Number of pages7
JournalArteriosclerosis and Thrombosis
Volume12
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

Keywords

  • body fatness
  • coronary heart disease
  • dietary cholesterol
  • mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Does body fatness modify the association between dietary cholesterol and risk of coronary death? Results from the Chicago Western Electric Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this