Does financial compensation for living kidney donation change willingness to donate?

E. J. Gordon*, C. H. Patel, M. W. Sohn, B. Hippen, L. A. Sherman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The potential use of financial compensation to increase living kidney donation rates remains controversial in potentially introducing undue inducement of vulnerable populations to donate. This cross-sectional study assessed amounts of financial compensation that would generate motivation and an undue inducement to donate to family/friends or strangers. Individuals leaving six Departments of Motor Vehicles were surveyed. Of the 210 participants who provided verbal consent (94% participation rate), respondents' willingness to donate would not change (70%), or would increase (29%) with compensation. Median lowest amounts of financial compensation for which participants would begin to consider donating a kidney were $5000 for family/friends, and $10000 for strangers; respondents reporting $0 for family/friends (52%) or strangers (26%) were excluded from analysis. Median lowest amounts of financial compensation for which participants could no longer decline (perceive an undue inducement) were $50000 for family/friends, and $100000 for strangers; respondents reporting $0 for family/friends (44%) or strangers (23%) were excluded from analysis. The two most preferred forms of compensation included: direct payment of money (61%) and paid leave (21%). The two most preferred uses of compensation included: paying off debt (38%) and paying nonmedical expenses associated with the transplant (29%). Findings suggest tolerance for, but little practical impact of, financial compensation. Certain compensation amounts could motivate the public to donate without being perceived as an undue inducement. In this cross-sectional survey study, the researchers report that willingness to donate a kidney as a living donor would not change (70%) or would increase (29%) with financial compensation, suggesting tolerance for, but little practical impact of, financial compensation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-273
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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