Does parenting shield youth from exposure to violence during adolescence? A 5-year longitudinal test in a high-poverty sample of minority youth

Richard Spano*, Craig Rivera, John M. Bolland

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Five waves of longitudinal data collected from 349 African American youth living in extreme poverty were used to determine if parental monitoring shielded youth from exposure to violence during adolescence. Semiparametric group modeling was used to identify trajectories of parental monitoring and exposure to violence from T1 to T5. Results from these analyses revealed (a) about 52% of youth had a trajectory of hypervigilant parental monitoring and (b) two out of the five distinct trajectories of exposure to violence were low and/or declining over the 5-year time period. Multivariate findings indicated that (a) youth with a trajectory of hypervigilant parenting were 109% more likely to have middle-declining exposure to violence, but hypervigilant parenting was unrelated to stable and low exposure to violence T1 to T5. The theoretical and policy implications of these findings as well as areas for future research are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)930-949
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

Keywords

  • African American youth
  • exposure to violence
  • group-based modeling
  • high poverty
  • parental monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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