Does reticular lamina active gain explain broad suppression tuning of SFOAEs?

Jonathan H Siegel*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) appear to originate primarily in the cochlear region of the CF place of the evoking probe tone. It is commonly believed that SFOAE generation is a byproduct of the cochlear amplifier that enhances basilar membrane vibrations near the characteristic frequency place. However, evidence from studies of SFOAEs revealed by suppressors more than an octave above that of the probe tone suggests generation extends basal to the region thought to contribute to mechanical amplification [3, 4]. This finding complicates the interpretation of the SFOAE phenomenon, because this basal region shows no evidence of nonlinear suppression in studies of basilar membrane vibrations. The recent reports from the Ren and Oghalai labs [7, 8, 10] show substantial active and vulnerable gain in the reticular lamina motion basal to the peak, where the basilar membrane appears passive and linear. It is thus plausible that basal SFOAE contributions arise from hair-cell-mediated reticular lamina amplification that is subject to two-Tone suppression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTo the Ear and Back Again - Advances in Auditory Biophysics
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 13th Mechanics of Hearing Workshop
EditorsChristopher Bergevin, Sunil Puria
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9780735416703
DOIs
StatePublished - May 31 2018
Event13th Mechanics of Hearing Workshop: To the Ear and Back Again - Advances in Auditory Biophysics, MoH 2017 - St. Catharines, Canada
Duration: Jun 19 2017Jun 24 2017

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume1965
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

Other13th Mechanics of Hearing Workshop: To the Ear and Back Again - Advances in Auditory Biophysics, MoH 2017
CountryCanada
CitySt. Catharines
Period6/19/176/24/17

Fingerprint

stimuli
tuning
retarding
membranes
suppressors
vibration
probes
octaves
hair
amplifiers
cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Siegel, J. H. (2018). Does reticular lamina active gain explain broad suppression tuning of SFOAEs? In C. Bergevin, & S. Puria (Eds.), To the Ear and Back Again - Advances in Auditory Biophysics: Proceedings of the 13th Mechanics of Hearing Workshop [140003] (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 1965). American Institute of Physics Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5038523
Siegel, Jonathan H. / Does reticular lamina active gain explain broad suppression tuning of SFOAEs?. To the Ear and Back Again - Advances in Auditory Biophysics: Proceedings of the 13th Mechanics of Hearing Workshop. editor / Christopher Bergevin ; Sunil Puria. American Institute of Physics Inc., 2018. (AIP Conference Proceedings).
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title = "Does reticular lamina active gain explain broad suppression tuning of SFOAEs?",
abstract = "Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) appear to originate primarily in the cochlear region of the CF place of the evoking probe tone. It is commonly believed that SFOAE generation is a byproduct of the cochlear amplifier that enhances basilar membrane vibrations near the characteristic frequency place. However, evidence from studies of SFOAEs revealed by suppressors more than an octave above that of the probe tone suggests generation extends basal to the region thought to contribute to mechanical amplification [3, 4]. This finding complicates the interpretation of the SFOAE phenomenon, because this basal region shows no evidence of nonlinear suppression in studies of basilar membrane vibrations. The recent reports from the Ren and Oghalai labs [7, 8, 10] show substantial active and vulnerable gain in the reticular lamina motion basal to the peak, where the basilar membrane appears passive and linear. It is thus plausible that basal SFOAE contributions arise from hair-cell-mediated reticular lamina amplification that is subject to two-Tone suppression.",
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Siegel, JH 2018, Does reticular lamina active gain explain broad suppression tuning of SFOAEs? in C Bergevin & S Puria (eds), To the Ear and Back Again - Advances in Auditory Biophysics: Proceedings of the 13th Mechanics of Hearing Workshop., 140003, AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 1965, American Institute of Physics Inc., 13th Mechanics of Hearing Workshop: To the Ear and Back Again - Advances in Auditory Biophysics, MoH 2017, St. Catharines, Canada, 6/19/17. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5038523

Does reticular lamina active gain explain broad suppression tuning of SFOAEs? / Siegel, Jonathan H.

To the Ear and Back Again - Advances in Auditory Biophysics: Proceedings of the 13th Mechanics of Hearing Workshop. ed. / Christopher Bergevin; Sunil Puria. American Institute of Physics Inc., 2018. 140003 (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 1965).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AB - Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) appear to originate primarily in the cochlear region of the CF place of the evoking probe tone. It is commonly believed that SFOAE generation is a byproduct of the cochlear amplifier that enhances basilar membrane vibrations near the characteristic frequency place. However, evidence from studies of SFOAEs revealed by suppressors more than an octave above that of the probe tone suggests generation extends basal to the region thought to contribute to mechanical amplification [3, 4]. This finding complicates the interpretation of the SFOAE phenomenon, because this basal region shows no evidence of nonlinear suppression in studies of basilar membrane vibrations. The recent reports from the Ren and Oghalai labs [7, 8, 10] show substantial active and vulnerable gain in the reticular lamina motion basal to the peak, where the basilar membrane appears passive and linear. It is thus plausible that basal SFOAE contributions arise from hair-cell-mediated reticular lamina amplification that is subject to two-Tone suppression.

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Siegel JH. Does reticular lamina active gain explain broad suppression tuning of SFOAEs? In Bergevin C, Puria S, editors, To the Ear and Back Again - Advances in Auditory Biophysics: Proceedings of the 13th Mechanics of Hearing Workshop. American Institute of Physics Inc. 2018. 140003. (AIP Conference Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5038523