Doubled-Up Households, Self-Management Behaviors, Diabetes Preventive Care Services, and Hospital Use in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) 2015–2020

Earle C. Chambers*, Simin Hua, Juan Lin, Ryung S. Kim, Marston E. Youngblood, Krista M. Perreira, Linda C. Gallo, Aida L. Giachello, Robert Kaplan, Madeline Crespo-Figueroa, Matthew J. O’brien, Marc D. Gellman, Carmen R. Isasi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE We investigated associations of living in a doubled-up household (i.e., adults living with adult children, other related adults, or other unrelated adults) with diabetes self-management behaviors, occurrence of diabetes preventive care services, and hospital use by Hispanic/Latino adults with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed data from the second clinical visit (2014–2017) through subsequent annual follow-up interviews completed through January 2020 of all participants with diabetes in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Multivariable regression was used to test associations between doubled-up status with diabetes self-management behaviors (i.e., checking blood glucose level, checking feet for sores), diabetes preventive care services done by a doctor (i.e., dilated-eye examination, feet checked, hemoglobin A1c measured, urine analysis for kidney function), and hospital use (i.e., emergency department [ED] visits and hospitalizations). RESULTS Hispanic/Latino adults living doubled up were less likely to have their urine checked by a doctor for kidney disease compared with adults not in doubled-up households. Doubled-up status was not associated with diabetes self-management behaviors. Adults living doubled up in a household with other related adults had a 33% increased risk of ED visits compared with adults living doubled up in a household with adult children. CONCLUSIONS Health care settings where Hispanic/Latino adults with diabetes receive trusted care should add housing characteristics such as doubled-up status to social-needs screening to identify residents in need of connecting with housing or social services and more targeted diabetes management services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)455-462
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes care
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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