Drug discovery for hearing loss: Phenotypic screening of chemical compounds on primary cultures of the spiral ganglion

Donna S Whitlon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the United States there are, at present, no drugs that are specifically FDA approved to treat hearing loss. Although several clinical trials are ongoing, including one testing D-methionine that is supported by the US Army, none of these trials directly address the effect of noise exposure on cochlear spiral ganglion neurons. We recently published the first report of a systematic chemical compound screen using primary, mammalian spiral ganglion cultures in which we were able to detect a compound and others in its class that increased neurite elongation, a critical step in restoring cochlear synapses after noise induced hearing loss. Here we discuss the issues, both pro and con, that influenced the development of our approach. These considerations may be useful for future compound screens that target the same or other attributes of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-181
Number of pages5
JournalHearing research
Volume349
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Spiral Ganglion
Cochlea
Drug Discovery
Hearing Loss
Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
Neurons
Neurites
Methionine
Synapses
Noise
Clinical Trials
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Cochlea
  • Deafness
  • In vitro
  • Neurite
  • Phenotypic screening
  • Statins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

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abstract = "In the United States there are, at present, no drugs that are specifically FDA approved to treat hearing loss. Although several clinical trials are ongoing, including one testing D-methionine that is supported by the US Army, none of these trials directly address the effect of noise exposure on cochlear spiral ganglion neurons. We recently published the first report of a systematic chemical compound screen using primary, mammalian spiral ganglion cultures in which we were able to detect a compound and others in its class that increased neurite elongation, a critical step in restoring cochlear synapses after noise induced hearing loss. Here we discuss the issues, both pro and con, that influenced the development of our approach. These considerations may be useful for future compound screens that target the same or other attributes of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons.",
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AB - In the United States there are, at present, no drugs that are specifically FDA approved to treat hearing loss. Although several clinical trials are ongoing, including one testing D-methionine that is supported by the US Army, none of these trials directly address the effect of noise exposure on cochlear spiral ganglion neurons. We recently published the first report of a systematic chemical compound screen using primary, mammalian spiral ganglion cultures in which we were able to detect a compound and others in its class that increased neurite elongation, a critical step in restoring cochlear synapses after noise induced hearing loss. Here we discuss the issues, both pro and con, that influenced the development of our approach. These considerations may be useful for future compound screens that target the same or other attributes of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons.

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KW - Neurite

KW - Phenotypic screening

KW - Statins

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