Drug-induced hemodynamic perturbations alter the disposition of markers of blood volume, extracellular fluid, and total body water

Tom C Krejcie, Zhao Wang, Michael J Avram*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recirculatory pharmacokinetic models for indocyanine green (ICG), inulin, and antipyrine facilitate description of intravascular mixing and tissue distribution following intravenous administration. These models characterized physiologic marker disposition in four awake dogs under control conditions and during phenylephrine, isoproterenol, and nitroprusside infusions. Systemic vascular resistance was more than doubled by phenylephrine and was decreased more than 50% by both isoproterenol and nitroprusside. Dye (ICG) dilution cardiac output (CO) was decreased nearly one-third by phenylephrine, was more than doubled by isoproterenol, and was largely unaffected by nitroprusside. Although phenylephrine reduced CO, the fraction of CO represented by nondistributive blood flow nearly doubled at the expense of blood flow to rapidly equilibrating tissues. The area under the blood antipyrine concentration versus time relationship for 3 min after administration (AUC0-3 min) during the phenylephrine infusion was nearly 75% larger than control due to both increased first-pass AUC and an increased fraction of CO represented by nondistributive blood flow. The large increase in CO produced by isoproterenol increased blood flow to rapidly equilibrating tissues and relatively decreased blood flow to slowly equilibrating tissues, because some appeared to equilibrate rapidly. Antipyrine AUC0-3 min during the isoproterenol infusion decreased more than 30%, due to decreased first-pass AUC. Nitroprusside changed antipyrine intercompartmental clearances in proportion to CO and, hence, had little effect on antipyrine AUC0-3 min. These data provide further evidence that changes in antipyrine (a lipophilic drug surrogate) blood flow-dependent distribution after rapid i.v. administration are not proportional to changes in CO but depend on both CO and its distribution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)922-930
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Volume296
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 14 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

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