Drug-Selected Resistance Mutations and Non-B Subtypes in Antiretroviral-Naive Adults with Established Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

George J. Hanna*, Henri U. Balaguera, Kenneth A. Freedberg, Barbara G. Werner, Kathleen A Steger Craven, Donald E. Craven, Richard T. D'Aquila

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 antiretroviral resistance is expected to be higher in recently infected antiretroviral-naive individuals than in those who have been infected longer. Antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected adults who presented to an outpatient clinic in an urban hospital in Boston for initial evaluation in 1999 were screened for drug-selected resistance mutations and phylogenetic subtype. Drug-selected mutations were identified in 16 (18%) of 88 subjects. Twelve (14%) included mutations associated with nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, 4 (5%) included mutations associated with non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, and 3 (3%) included mutations associated with protease inhibitors. Two (2%) had resistance mutations associated with multiple classes of drugs. Nine (10%) subjects had infection with non-B subtype HIV-1 and did not have drug-selected mutations. Serological results indicated infection for ≥6 months. Drug-selected mutations or non-B subtypes were detected in a substantial portion of antiretroviral-naive adults who had been infected for at least 6 months.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)986-991
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume188
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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