Dyadic predictors of outcome in a cognitive-behavioral program for patients with generalized anxiety disorder in committed relationships: A "spoonful of sugar" and a dose of non-hostile criticism may help

Richard E. Zinbarg*, Jeong Eun Lee, K. Lira Yoon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study tested whether pre-treatment levels of partner hostility and non-hostile criticism predicted outcome in an individual cognitive-behavioral therapy package for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Eighteen patients with a principal or co-principal diagnosis of GAD were randomly allocated to a treatment condition (n = 8) or a delayed treatment condition (n = 10). In addition, the patients and their partners were videotaped discussing the patients' worries. These videotapes were later coded for levels of partner hostility and non-hostile criticism directed at the patients. Treatment resulted in statistically and clinically significant change at post-test. Finally, partner hostility predicted worse end-state functioning whereas partner non-hostile criticism predicted better end-state functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)699-713
Number of pages15
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007

Keywords

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • Couple functioning
  • Exposure therapy
  • Generalized anxiety disorder
  • Treatment outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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