Dynamic analysis of the individual patterns of intakes, voids, and bladder sensations reported in bladder diaries collected in the LURN study

Victor P. Andreev*, Margaret E. Helmuth, Abigail R. Smith, Anna Zisman, Anne P. Cameron, John O.L. DeLancey, Wade A. Bushman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The goal of this study was to develop the novel analytical approach and to perform an indepth dynamic analysis of individual bladder diaries to inform which behavioral modifications would best reduce lower urinary tract symptoms, such as frequency and urgency. Threeday bladder diaries containing data on timing, volumes, and types of fluid intake, as well as timing, volumes, and bladder sensation at voids were analyzed for 197 participants with lower urinary tract symptoms. A novel dynamic analytic approach to bladder diary time series data was proposed and developed, including intra-subject correlations between timevarying variables: rates of intake, bladder filling rate, and urge growth rate. Grey-box models of bladder filling rate and multivariable linear regression models of urge growth rate were developed for individual diaries. These models revealed that bladder filling rate, rather than urine volume, was the primary determinant of urinary frequency and urgency growth rate in the majority of participants. Simulations performed with the developed models predicted that the most beneficial behavioral modifications to reduce the number of urgency episodes are those that smooth profiles of bladder filling rate, which might include behaviors such as exclusion of caffeine and alcohol and/or other measures, e.g., increasing number and decreasing volumes of intakes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0284544
JournalPloS one
Volume18
Issue number11 November
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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