Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the effect of ventricular wall curvature on regional function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Satoshi Nakatani, Richard D. White*, Kimerly A. Powell, Harry M. Lever, James D. Thomas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

We hypothesized that contraction within the ventricular septum in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) may be related to its abnormal morphology because ventricular wall stress is related to wall curvature by the Laplace equation. To test this, we studied 17 HC patients with various septal morphologies using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Short- and long-axis curvatures of the basal septal and basal lateral walls were determined on cine images as the reciprocal of the radius of the arc best fit to the endocardial contour, which was negative if the wall was convex to the cavity of the left ventricle. Endocardial and epicardial intramyocardial circumferential shortening (% circumferential shortening) was measured in the septal and lateral walls on basal short-axis myocardial togging images. Septal walls were flatter in the short-axis plane and more convex toward the left ventricular cavity in the long-axis plane than lateral walls, as indicated by smaller short- and long-axis curvatures. Septal percent circumferential shortening was significantly lower than the lateral percent circumferential shortening, suggesting reduced septal contraction. Endocardial and epicardial percent circumferential shortening showed significant positive correlations with wall curvatures. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that both short- and long-axis curvatures significantly contributed to percent circumferential shortening (r = 0.87 for endocardial and r = 0.70 for epicardial, both p <0.0001). In conclusion, wall curvature is related to wall function in HC; the more convex toward the left ventricular cavity the wall is, the less it contracts. Reduced contraction of the septum in HC may be partly due to its abnormal curvature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)618-622
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume77
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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