Dynamically interchangeable nanoparticle superlattices through the use of nucleic acid-based allosteric effectors

Youngeun Kim, Robert J. Macfarlane, Chad A Mirkin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

DNA is a powerful tool for programmably assembling colloidal crystals, and has been used to generate nanoparticle superlattices with synthetically adjustable lattice parameters and crystal symmetries. However, the majority of these superlattice structures remain static once constructed, and factors such as interparticle distance cannot be controlled in a facile and rapid manner. Incorporation of these materials into functional devices would be greatly benefitted by the ability to change various aspects of the crystal assembly after the lattice has been synthesized. Herein, we present a reversible, rapid, and stoichiometric on-the-fly manipulation of nanoparticle superlattices with allosteric effectors based upon DNA. This approach is applicable to multiple different crystal symmetries, including FCC, BCC, CsCl, and AlB2.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10342-10345
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume135
Issue number28
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 17 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Catalysis
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

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