Dysregulated Irritability as a Window on Young Children's Psychiatric Risk: Transdiagnostic Effects via the Family Check-Up

Justin D. Smith, Lauren Wakschlag, Sheila Krogh-Jespersen, John T. Walkup, Melvin N. Wilson, Thomas J. Dishion, Daniel S. Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Building on prior work using Tom Dishion's Family Check-Up, the current article examined intervention effects on dysregulated irritability in early childhood. Dysregulated irritability, defined as reactive and intense response to frustration, and prolonged angry mood, is an ideal marker of neurodevelopmental vulnerability to later psychopathology because it is a transdiagnostic indicator of decrements in self-regulation that are measurable in the first years of life that have lifelong implications for health and disease. This study is perhaps the first randomized trial to examine the direct effects of an evidence- and family-based intervention, the Family Check-Up (FCU), on irritability in early childhood and the effects of reductions in irritability on later risk of child internalizing and externalizing symptomatology. Data from the geographically and sociodemographically diverse multisite Early Steps randomized prevention trial were used. Path modeling revealed intervention effects on irritability at age 4, which predicted lower externalizing and internalizing symptoms at age 10.5. Results indicate that family-based programs initiated in early childhood can reduce early childhood irritability and later risk for psychopathology. This holds promise for earlier identification and prevention approaches that target transdiagnostic pathways. Implications for future basic and prevention research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1887-1899
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopment and psychopathology
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Fingerprint

Child Psychiatry
Psychopathology
Frustration
Health
Research

Keywords

  • Family Check-Up
  • early childhood
  • irritability
  • mental health
  • parent training
  • prevention
  • transdiagnostic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{22b9fbce1dfb4b238eb79b48373bc0f5,
title = "Dysregulated Irritability as a Window on Young Children's Psychiatric Risk: Transdiagnostic Effects via the Family Check-Up",
abstract = "Building on prior work using Tom Dishion's Family Check-Up, the current article examined intervention effects on dysregulated irritability in early childhood. Dysregulated irritability, defined as reactive and intense response to frustration, and prolonged angry mood, is an ideal marker of neurodevelopmental vulnerability to later psychopathology because it is a transdiagnostic indicator of decrements in self-regulation that are measurable in the first years of life that have lifelong implications for health and disease. This study is perhaps the first randomized trial to examine the direct effects of an evidence- and family-based intervention, the Family Check-Up (FCU), on irritability in early childhood and the effects of reductions in irritability on later risk of child internalizing and externalizing symptomatology. Data from the geographically and sociodemographically diverse multisite Early Steps randomized prevention trial were used. Path modeling revealed intervention effects on irritability at age 4, which predicted lower externalizing and internalizing symptoms at age 10.5. Results indicate that family-based programs initiated in early childhood can reduce early childhood irritability and later risk for psychopathology. This holds promise for earlier identification and prevention approaches that target transdiagnostic pathways. Implications for future basic and prevention research are discussed.",
keywords = "Family Check-Up, early childhood, irritability, mental health, parent training, prevention, transdiagnostic",
author = "Smith, {Justin D.} and Lauren Wakschlag and Sheila Krogh-Jespersen and Walkup, {John T.} and Wilson, {Melvin N.} and Dishion, {Thomas J.} and Shaw, {Daniel S.}",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S0954579419000816",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "1887--1899",
journal = "Development and Psychopathology",
issn = "0954-5794",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "5",

}

Dysregulated Irritability as a Window on Young Children's Psychiatric Risk : Transdiagnostic Effects via the Family Check-Up. / Smith, Justin D.; Wakschlag, Lauren; Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila; Walkup, John T.; Wilson, Melvin N.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Shaw, Daniel S.

In: Development and psychopathology, Vol. 31, No. 5, 01.12.2019, p. 1887-1899.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dysregulated Irritability as a Window on Young Children's Psychiatric Risk

T2 - Transdiagnostic Effects via the Family Check-Up

AU - Smith, Justin D.

AU - Wakschlag, Lauren

AU - Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila

AU - Walkup, John T.

AU - Wilson, Melvin N.

AU - Dishion, Thomas J.

AU - Shaw, Daniel S.

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Building on prior work using Tom Dishion's Family Check-Up, the current article examined intervention effects on dysregulated irritability in early childhood. Dysregulated irritability, defined as reactive and intense response to frustration, and prolonged angry mood, is an ideal marker of neurodevelopmental vulnerability to later psychopathology because it is a transdiagnostic indicator of decrements in self-regulation that are measurable in the first years of life that have lifelong implications for health and disease. This study is perhaps the first randomized trial to examine the direct effects of an evidence- and family-based intervention, the Family Check-Up (FCU), on irritability in early childhood and the effects of reductions in irritability on later risk of child internalizing and externalizing symptomatology. Data from the geographically and sociodemographically diverse multisite Early Steps randomized prevention trial were used. Path modeling revealed intervention effects on irritability at age 4, which predicted lower externalizing and internalizing symptoms at age 10.5. Results indicate that family-based programs initiated in early childhood can reduce early childhood irritability and later risk for psychopathology. This holds promise for earlier identification and prevention approaches that target transdiagnostic pathways. Implications for future basic and prevention research are discussed.

AB - Building on prior work using Tom Dishion's Family Check-Up, the current article examined intervention effects on dysregulated irritability in early childhood. Dysregulated irritability, defined as reactive and intense response to frustration, and prolonged angry mood, is an ideal marker of neurodevelopmental vulnerability to later psychopathology because it is a transdiagnostic indicator of decrements in self-regulation that are measurable in the first years of life that have lifelong implications for health and disease. This study is perhaps the first randomized trial to examine the direct effects of an evidence- and family-based intervention, the Family Check-Up (FCU), on irritability in early childhood and the effects of reductions in irritability on later risk of child internalizing and externalizing symptomatology. Data from the geographically and sociodemographically diverse multisite Early Steps randomized prevention trial were used. Path modeling revealed intervention effects on irritability at age 4, which predicted lower externalizing and internalizing symptoms at age 10.5. Results indicate that family-based programs initiated in early childhood can reduce early childhood irritability and later risk for psychopathology. This holds promise for earlier identification and prevention approaches that target transdiagnostic pathways. Implications for future basic and prevention research are discussed.

KW - Family Check-Up

KW - early childhood

KW - irritability

KW - mental health

KW - parent training

KW - prevention

KW - transdiagnostic

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074964755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85074964755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0954579419000816

DO - 10.1017/S0954579419000816

M3 - Article

C2 - 31370913

AN - SCOPUS:85074964755

VL - 31

SP - 1887

EP - 1899

JO - Development and Psychopathology

JF - Development and Psychopathology

SN - 0954-5794

IS - 5

ER -