Early clinical markers and CD4 percentage in subjects with human immunodeficiency virus infection

Mark R. Wallace, Ronald B. Moss*, H. James Beecham, Christopher J. Grace, Evan M. Hersh, Eskild Peterson, Robert Murphy, David H. Shepp, Frederick P. Siegal, John L. Turner, Sharon Safrin, Dennis J. Carlo, Alexandra M. Levine

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a clinical trial involving asymptomatic, HIV-seropositive subjects treated with either the HIV-1 immunogen (an inactivated, gp120-depleted HIV- 1 virus in incomplete Freund's adjuvant) or an adjuvant control, we examined the relationship between changes in the percentage of CD4 cells over time and early clinical markers of HIV disease progression. Subjects who had an early clinical event were more likely to have a greater decline in the percentage of CD4 cells than those subjects who did not have a clinical event (p = 0.054). The greatest decline in CD4 percentage occurred within 10 weeks prior to a clinical event (mean 11% decrease from baseline). Subjects from the quartile with the greatest decline in CD4 percentage had a fivefold greater risk of having a clinical event than subjects from the quartile with the second largest decline (p = 0.045). These results demonstrate a relationship between changes in the percentage of CD4 cells and early clinical events. Further validation of this association may be useful in clinical monitoring and in evaluating therapies to treat HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)358-362
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Keywords

  • CD4 percent
  • Early HIV clinical events
  • Surrogate markers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Virology

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    Wallace, M. R., Moss, R. B., Beecham, H. J., Grace, C. J., Hersh, E. M., Peterson, E., Murphy, R., Shepp, D. H., Siegal, F. P., Turner, J. L., Safrin, S., Carlo, D. J., & Levine, A. M. (1996). Early clinical markers and CD4 percentage in subjects with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes and Human Retrovirology, 12(4), 358-362. https://doi.org/10.1097/00042560-199608010-00005