Early diabetes screening in obese women

Samadh F. Ravangard*, Ashley E. Scott, Dimitrios Mastrogiannis, Michelle Kominiarek

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To describe maternal characteristics related to early screening for diabetes in obese women and evaluate the benefits of early diabetes screening and diagnosis. Study design: Retrospective cohort of obese women (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) without pregestational diabetes who delivered a singleton gestation between 2011 and 2012. Maternal characteristics/demographics and maternal and neonatal outcomes were compared between women with early diabetes screening (<20 weeks) versus traditional screening. We additionally compared maternal and neonatal outcomes for women with an early versus traditional diabetes diagnosis. Results: Of the 504 eligible women, 135 (26.8%) had early diabetes screening. Obese women with early screening were older, had a higher BMI, were more likely to have hypertension and neonates admitted to the NICU. Of women with early screening, 31 (23%) were diagnosed early. Women with an early diagnosis of diabetes were more likely to require treatment with insulin (36% vs. 23%, p = 0.003). Women with an early diagnosis of diabetes were more likely to have neonates in the NICU (48% vs. 26%, p = 0.03). Conclusions: Early screening for diabetes was more common in older women with additional comorbidities. Obese women diagnosed via early screening were more likely to require medical treatment for diabetes, suggesting a value to early screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2784-2788
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume30
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2 2017

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Mothers
Early Diagnosis
Newborn Infant
Comorbidity
Retrospective Studies
Demography
Insulin
Hypertension
Pregnancy
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Pregnancy
  • diabetes
  • neonatal outcomes
  • obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Ravangard, Samadh F. ; Scott, Ashley E. ; Mastrogiannis, Dimitrios ; Kominiarek, Michelle. / Early diabetes screening in obese women. In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 30, No. 23. pp. 2784-2788.
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abstract = "Objective: To describe maternal characteristics related to early screening for diabetes in obese women and evaluate the benefits of early diabetes screening and diagnosis. Study design: Retrospective cohort of obese women (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) without pregestational diabetes who delivered a singleton gestation between 2011 and 2012. Maternal characteristics/demographics and maternal and neonatal outcomes were compared between women with early diabetes screening (<20 weeks) versus traditional screening. We additionally compared maternal and neonatal outcomes for women with an early versus traditional diabetes diagnosis. Results: Of the 504 eligible women, 135 (26.8{\%}) had early diabetes screening. Obese women with early screening were older, had a higher BMI, were more likely to have hypertension and neonates admitted to the NICU. Of women with early screening, 31 (23{\%}) were diagnosed early. Women with an early diagnosis of diabetes were more likely to require treatment with insulin (36{\%} vs. 23{\%}, p = 0.003). Women with an early diagnosis of diabetes were more likely to have neonates in the NICU (48{\%} vs. 26{\%}, p = 0.03). Conclusions: Early screening for diabetes was more common in older women with additional comorbidities. Obese women diagnosed via early screening were more likely to require medical treatment for diabetes, suggesting a value to early screening.",
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Early diabetes screening in obese women. / Ravangard, Samadh F.; Scott, Ashley E.; Mastrogiannis, Dimitrios; Kominiarek, Michelle.

In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 23, 02.12.2017, p. 2784-2788.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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