Early-Life Gut Dysbiosis: A Driver of Later-Life Fibrosis?

Karen J. Ho, John Varga*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using a novel mouse model of scleroderma induced by immunization with topoisomerase-I peptide-loaded dendritic cells, Mehta et al. found that early-life antibiotic exposure resulted in increased later-life fibrosis in the skin and lungs. These observations advance the novel concept that gut microbiome alterations caused by early-life exposures may contribute to scleroderma pathogenesis, and warrant in-depth characterization and validation in complementary disease models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2253-2255
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Investigative Dermatology
Volume137
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Dermatology
  • Cell Biology

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