Early suppressive antiretroviral therapy in HIV infection is associated with measurable changes in the corpus callosum

Sean G. Kelly, Babafemi O. Taiwo, Ying Wu, Ramona Bhatia, Casey S. Kettering, Yi Gao, Suyang Li, Ryan Hutten, Ann B. Ragin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of early suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) on brain structure and neurocognitive outcomes. We conducted an observational study of subjects within 1 year of HIV infection. Ten ART-naïve and 10 ART-suppressed individuals were matched for age and infection duration and age-matched to 10 HIV-seronegative controls. Quantitative brain imaging and neurocognitive data were analyzed. Subjects on suppressive ART had diminished corpus callosum structural integrity on macromolecular and microstructural imaging, higher cerebrospinal fluid percent, higher depression scores, and lower functional performance. Early suppressive ART may alter the trajectory of neurological progression of HIV infection, particularly in the corpus callosum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)514-520
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of neurovirology
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 21 2014

Keywords

  • Corpus callosum
  • Diffusion tensor imaging
  • Early antiretroviral therapy
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Magnetization transfer ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Virology

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