Education research: Neurology training reassessed-The 2011 American Academy of Neurology Resident Survey results

Nicholas E. Johnson*, Matthew B. Maas, Mary Coleman, Ralph Jozefowicz, John Engstrom

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. Methods: A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Results: Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Conclusions: Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1831-1834
Number of pages4
JournalNeurology
Volume79
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 23 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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